19th JULY – from 5pm

DAVID GILLESPIE

Author of “Teen Brain”

Raising Teens in the Digital Age – on stage in conversation with MAGGIE DENT

Being a teenager has always been challenging, across every generation throughout history – but the digital age has added fuel to the hormone laden fire. Who better to guide parents through these tricky years than Maggie Dent & David Gillespie. Bring your questions, they’ve got the answers.

The conversation will be followed by an intimate meet & greet with David and Maggie and a book signing for both their books.

Join us for the third event in the Institute of Interesting Ideas Winter Series, Kiama. Tickets from $55

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ABOUT DAVID

David Gillespie is a lawyer and the best-selling author of Sweet Poison, a book published in 2008 about how we are all poisoning ourselves with sugar. That book is generally credited with starting the current wave of sugar awareness in Australia.

He followed Sweet Poison up with 4 more books about nutrition and diet. Then, having upset the dietetics industry by writing about stuff in which he has no qualifications, he turned his focus to something else he is unqualified to write about, education.

In his 2014 work, Free Schools, David took a parent’s eye-view of the research and concluded that all the rolling green hockey fields and architect designed amphitheaters won’t make a jot of difference to the education your child is likely to receive if their school principal is no good at their job.

Detouring briefly back to nutrition in his 7th and 8th books (Eat Real food, 2015 and the Eat Real Food Cookbook 2016), his next target is Psychology with his much anticipated book on surviving contact with psychopaths in the workplace and at home.

David is a superb inspirational speaker who, in sharing his personal stories, will change lives for the better. He is an incredibly powerful, positive and passionate speaker and audiences cannot fail to be affected.

ABOUT “TEEN BRAIN”

With their labile and rapidly developing brains, adolescents are particularly susceptible to addiction, and addiction leads to anxiety and depression.

What few parents will know is that what we think of as the most typical addictions and problematic teen behaviours – smoking, drinking, drug taking, sex leading to teenage pregnancy – are on the decline.

The bad news is that a whole raft of addictions has taken their place. Whereas once the dopamine-hungry brain of a teenager got its fix from smoking a joint or sculling a Bundy and coke, it is now turning to electronic devices for the pleasure jolt that typically comes from online playing games and engaging with social media.

What is doubly troubling is that, unlike drugs, alcohol and cigarettes, electronic devices are not illicit. Quite the contrary. They are liberally distributed by schools and parents, with few restrictions placed on their use.

And, to add fuel to the fire, emerging research shows that if addictive pathways are activated during the teen years, they are there for life, and that what starts as a screen addiction can lead to major substance abuse later in life.

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